Zika Update

Traveling abroad this Summer? Use the tips below to protect yourself & others from Zika.

Picture of doctor CDC

Prevent Zika

UM Correspondence
University Advisory - 08/02/16
University Advisory - 08/09/16
University Advisory - 08/23/16
Parents Letter - August 2016
University Update - 10/10/16

ZIKA & PREGNANCY

As confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly,  severe fetal brain defects, and other problems in infants.  Pregnant women, those planning to become pregnant, and their sexual partners should take appropriate steps to prevent Zika infection.

ZIKA & FUTURE PREGNANCY

According to the available evidence, the CDC states that Zika virus infection in a woman who is not pregnant would not pose a risk for birth defects in future pregnancies after the virus has cleared from her blood. From what we know about similar infections, once a person has been infected with Zika virus, he or she is likely to be protected from a future Zika infection.  

For more information visit the CDC’s Zika & Pregnancy webpage.

ZIKA & SEXUAL TRANSMISSION

Zika can be passed through sex which includes vaginal, anal, oral sex and the sharing of sex toys. Take precautions to protect yourself and your partner by wearing condoms and other barriers.  To be effective, condoms should be used from start to finish, every time during vaginal, anal, and oral sex.    Transmission is possible prior to the start of symptoms, while symptoms are present, or during Zika infection even if symptoms never develop.  Zika can remain in semen for 6 months, which is longer than it lasts in other body fluids. Men who may have been exposed to the Zika virus but haven't had symptoms should wait at least 6 months after the last possible exposure before attempting to conceive with their partner, whereas women should wait at least 8 weeks after symptoms start or last possible exposure. Studies are underway to find out how long Zika lasts in other body fluids and how long it can be passed to sex partners.  For more information visit the CDC website on Zika and sexual transmission.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Zika Map

Zika cautionary area (yellow area): A geographic area where local transmission has been identified, but evidence is lacking that the intensity of transmission is comparable to that in a red area. Although the specific level of risk in yellow areas is unknown, there is still a risk to pregnant women. Additionally, areas adjacent or close to red areas may have a greater likelihood of local Zika virus transmission and are considered to pose a risk to pregnant women. Miami-Dade County is designated as a cautionary yellow area.


UM students who are pregnant, seeking to become pregnant, or in a sexual relationship with someone pregnant, or seeking to become pregnant, should avoid traveling areas of local Zika transmission. Pregnant women and partners of pregnant women who are concerned about potential Zika virus exposure may also consider postponing nonessential travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County. Everyone should take appropriate steps to prevent the spread of Zika by avoiding mosquito bites. Use the following links to learn how to create a Zika prevention kit and for a list of effective mosquito repellents

 

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES ZIKA RESPONSE

The University of Miami has been strictly following the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidance regarding identifying and draining areas of contained water as these locations have previously been known to be mosquito breeding grounds. The University has not identified any locations on campus where mosquitos appear to be breeding or congregating and we continue to conduct proactive surveillance for these locations on a daily basis. Additionally, we have solicited the assistance of all University employees to immediately report any area of standing contained water to our Facilities Management and Physical Plant teams who are prepared to respond with highly targeted spraying. The FDOH and CDC have not recommended aerial or wide area spraying for any UM campus.

As an additional measure which extends beyond current guidance, UM has engaged Miami-Dade Mosquito Control to conduct an assessment of the Coral Gables, Medical, and Marine Campuses. Mosquito dunk has also been placed in storm drains which have historically been known to be breeding locations. The University of Miami is participating in daily conference calls with local and state partners to ensure our ongoing awareness of the very latest information regarding the Zika Virus. We are prepared to implement any additional measures recommended by local government, FDOH, or the CDC.

What we know:

  • Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). These mosquitoes are aggressive daytime biters. They can also bite at night.
  • Zika can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause certain birth defects.
  • Research strongly suggests an association between Zika infection and Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) with some Zika affected countries reporting an increased incidence of Guillain Barre. In a recent study the incidence of GBS associated with Zika or other flavivirus infection was 2.5 times the GBS incidence not associated with such evidence. Typically, 1- 4 out of every 100,000 persons in the general population develop Guillain Barre Syndrome each year.  The most common antecedent symptoms in patients with GBS and proven infection were rash, fever, and diarrhea; the median interval between infection symptoms and GBS was 5 day. The most common GBS symptoms included hypo- or areflexia, leg weakness, leg paresthesia, arm weakness, facial weakness, arm numbness, and dysphagi
  • There is no vaccine or medicine for Zika.
  • The Florida Department of Health has identified areas in Miami where Zika is being spread by mosquitoes. Learn more
  • Have questions about Zika? The Florida Department of Health has created a Zika Hotline (1-855-622-6735). Calls to this hotline are being answered 24/7 by the doctors, nurses and pharmacists at Florida’s poison control centers. The service is free and fully confidential. The hotline receives timely updates from the DOH and can help people assess their risk and determine if they may have become exposed to the Zika virus.

 

Zika Cases in Texas

Zika Cases in Texas

 

Zika Cases in Florida

Zika Cases in Florida

 

Travel Smart this Holiday Season

Travel Smart this Holiday Season

 

CDC Interim Zika Response Plan

CDC Interim Zika Response Plan

 

Pregnant women

Pregnant women

 

Areas with Zika

Areas with Zika